Valve’s Steam Machines and Controller

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Hardware

Valve’s Steam Machines and Controller 😕

Bring your existing collection of PC games with you to the living room

We already knew that Valve would share a few more details regarding its Steam Machines and Steam Controller at the (GDC 2015). Valve is definitely serious about bringing gaming to the living room and while it will have some competition from Nvidia’s new Shield Console Android TV Set-top box, Valve’s Steam Machines, at least some of them, pack quite a bit more punch and do not rely on cloud gaming for more demanding titles.

Steam Machines, Windows PCs, Macs, and Linux PCs will be able to take advantage of a new product called Steam Link. Designed to extend your Steam experience to any room in the house, Steam Link allows you to stream all your Steam content from any PC or Steam Machine on the same home network. Supporting 1080p at 60Hz with low latency, Steam Link will be available this November 2015 for $49.99, and available with a Steam Controller for an additional $49.99 in the US (worldwide pricing to be released closer to launch).

Steam Machines from partners Alienware and Falcon Northwest are being shown, with Machines from a dozen other partners slated to release this November 2015. Steam Machines will start at the same price point as game consoles, with higher performance. Customers interested in the best possible gaming experience can choose whichever components meet their needs. Epic give a demonstration of the newly announced Unreal Tournament running on a 4K monitor driven by the Falcon Northwest Steam Machine. “We love this platform,” said Tim Sweeney.

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Valve also announced the Source 2 engine, the successor to the Source engine used in Valve’s games since the launch of Counter-Strike: Source and Half-Life 2. The value of a platform like the PC is how much it increases the productivity of those who use the platform. With Source 2, our focus is increasing creator productivity. Given how important user generated content is becoming, Source 2 is designed not for just the professional developer, but enabling gamers themselves to participate in the creation and development of their favorite games, said Valve’s Jay Stelly. “We will be making Source 2 available for free to content developers. This combined with recent announcements by Epic and Unity will help continue the PCs dominance as the premiere content authoring platform.

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Also as part of supporting PC gaming, Valve announced that it will be releasing a Vulkan-compatible version of the Source 2 engine. Vulkan is a cross-platform, cross-vendor 3D graphics API that allows game developers to get the most out of the latest graphics hardware, and ensures hardware developers that there is a consistent, low overhead method of taking advantage of products. Vulkan, previously called Next Generation OpenGL, is administered by the Khronos Group, along with other standards such as OpenCL, OpenGL, and WebGL.

Valve has updated its Steam Universe page with a list of hardware all due to launch later this year, kicking off the company’s assault on living room gaming. The Steam Universe page originally launched towards the end of 2013, when Valve announced the Steam Machines, controller and OS. On the page you can see the final version of the Steam controller, the new virtual reality headset known as The Vive and even Valve’s own mini cheap streaming box known as the Steam Link, which will allow users to stream from the PC to the TV without needing a Steam Machine.

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There you have it the rundown about Steam Link and what happen with Valve at Game Developer Conference 2015. Steam Link was no where on this years raider and now that I seen what its going to bring to the table for PC gamers like myself, I’m excited and want one now! Honestly though I wasn’t all that excited because of the talk that’s been happening over the years with this device, it’s nice to see little devices like the Steam Link.

There’s no cloud involved you can download a game from steam, go offline and stream it to any PC in the house, without any problems of dealing with cloud features. It reminds me of a Windows Media Center extender, a device that adds more flexibly to the table. Sitting in front of a PC all day really ant good for anyone and been able to just stream a game from The Lab out to a device will be extremely appreciated. Plus with all the recent updates that came to Steam and over the course of 2014 I think it’s going to be amazing.

PhoneyVirus
PhoneyVirus
Has a passion for computer hardware and dream’s of been a professional technician one day, fairly educated on the subject and opened minded. Programing maybe one of many interest, but are divided into what you call time. When he ant learning what’s new, he’s usually jamming out on electric guitar or playing some awesome PC Game.

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